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Zoe Fairbairns Interview

Posted on 13 February 2004. © Copyright 2004-2018 WriteWords
A longer version of this interview is available to WriteWords Full and Community Members.
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WriteWords talks to multi-award-winning novelist and short story writer Zoe Fairbairns, whose new short story collection, How Do You Pronounce Nulliparous? is about to be published by Five Leaves (interview coming soon.)

Tell us about your books, any wards you’ve won, etc

My novels include Benefits, Stand We At Last, Here Today, Closing, Daddy's Girls and Other Names. Here Today won the 1984 Fawcett Book prize; Benefits was shortlisted for the Hawthornden Prize for imaginative literature and the Philip K Dick award for science fiction; and in 1998 Other Names was shortlisted for the Romantic Novelists' Association award. I've also written short stories, drama, poetry and non-fiction. You can find a complete list on the British Council Contemporary Writers website - http://www.contemporarywriters.com/authors/?p=auth02B25O565512626655

How did you start writing?

I wrote my first story on the flyleaf of an old copy of Rudyard Kipling's The Just So Stories, when I was four. I don't know why I did it; it seemed like a natural thing to do.

Who are your favourite writers and why?

I don't have favourite writers, just favourite books. If I am ever cast away on a desert island with my choice of books, they will include Vida by Marge Piercy, Slaves of Solitude by Patrick Hamilton, Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont by Elizabeth Taylor, Movement by Valerie Miner, A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth, London Transports by Maeve Binchy, Polaris and other Stories by Fay Weldon, Au Bonheur des Dames by Emile Zola.<br><br>



A longer version of this interview is available to WriteWords Full and Community Members.
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Comments by other Members



old friend at 17:09 on 18 February 2004  Report this post
Fascinating. These interviews can be so rewarding and I particularly liked this one for Zoe appears not only to be a truly professional writer with a down-to-earth and constructive attitude but also a very nice person.

I just loved the 'fiendish revenge' bit!

Len

Zigeroon at 19:57 on 20 March 2004  Report this post


I agree with Len. An insight into how normally abnormal the writing life is with stories chasing you around demanding to be written and the need to remain grounded especially when you become successful.

Andrew


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